Planning Commission grants Chloe ‘the farmer’ her ‘agricultural store’ and unlocks €200,000 EU funds

It took the Planning Commission less than two minutes to approve the sanctioning of long stretches of illegal rubble walls and the construction of an agricultural store on unspoilt arable land in the outskirts of Nadur.

The Shift reported yesterday that Chloe Portelli, daughter of Gozitan construction magnate Joseph Portelli, would get her way during the hearing today despite objections by the Environment and Resources Authority and all major NGOs.

This news portal has documented the illegalities on the site, which include rubble walls built along 18 tumoli of land. The government allocated €200,000 EU funds for the project despite the illegalities. The permit sanctioning the illegalities, against a fine of a mere €2,000 granted today, allows the Portellis to cash in on the project.

The tract of land on which the Portellis built long stretches of illegal rubble walls.

Chloe Portelli, 24, who is employed as the General Manager of her father’s chain of hotels in Gozo, also got the permit for an ‘agricultural store’ she wants to build on the same land enjoying unobstructed sea and country views. She recently registered herself as a ‘farmer’ – a common move to acquire development permits in ODZ.

In fact, the Environment and Resources Authority also expressed concern that her ‘agricultural store’ might be the beginning of something larger – possibly a new residence – built in a piecemeal fashion, as already happened in many ODZ areas using ‘farming’ as an excuse.

Known as Ġebel l-Aħmar, situated just underneath the iconic Kenuna Tower in Nadur, the large stretch of farmland was originally bought by Joseph Portelli some years ago and then transferred to his children, including Chloe.

The views Chloe Portelli will enjoy from her ‘agriculture store’ in Gozo.

Before any planning application was filed, residents confirmed that truckloads of stones and building material were transferred onto the farmland, and an army of migrants built long stretches of ‘rubble walls’ that changed the landscape of the area.

The Planning Commission’s green light has now settled the issue, despite public anger at a dubious process.

                           
                               
guest
5 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Simon Oosterman
Simon Oosterman
5 months ago

It is all so blatant but most most don’t care and so ‘continuity’ persists.

Winston Smith
Winston Smith
5 months ago

The deafening silence from both sides of our parliament bears testimony to the lack of commitment to crack down on abuses. The crooks everywhere have had their silence and support bought. What is so sad about this case is that it not only makes a mockery out of our institutions and law abiding citizens, but at the end the culprit receives a reward. A €1500 fine turned into a €200,00 prize. We need to take the law from beneath their feet to in our hands. F**k them all!

M. Galea
M. Galea
5 months ago
Reply to  Winston Smith

Well said!

Iain Morrison
Iain Morrison
5 months ago

Wow. What a very clever young lady. Who’d have thought she would be able to get permission to build a farmhouse, become a young succesful farmer and receive EU funding? Can’t imagine why more young people don’t follow her example and get themselves a rich well connected father.

Joseph
Joseph
5 months ago
Reply to  Iain Morrison

Il-Maltin jehtieg jifhmu li l-PA qeda hemm biex tiddefendi l’ambjent u mhux biex taghtih ghal skop individwali ghal flus u bini..altrimenti.

Related Stories

Government blocks democracy even as it commits to defending it
Insisting that “outsiders” did not have an automatic right
Government vague on timeline for public inquiry recommendations, denies impunity verdict
Prime minister Robert Abela, speaking at an extraordinary parliamentary
Support investigative journalism that speaks truth to power.