Maltese government silent on whether it will seek access to German purchase of Dubai tax data leak

Malta government spokespeople have failed to respond to questions about whether they have approached the German government to obtain any information about Maltese nationals or residents who may be named in the vast cache of Dubai data it has purchased from a whistleblower.

The German government announced on 16 June that on 14 January this year, it began negotiations with an anonymous informant to buy data containing extensive information on millions of taxpayers worldwide who hold assets in Dubai.

The German finance ministry said on its website that it had bought the data for the specific purpose of detecting international crimes.

The Federal Central Tax Office, which carried out the negotiations, acquired the data on 10 February, since when it’s been edited and analysed in order to be passed on to the relevant authorities.

The international money laundering watchdog, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), while explaining its reasons for greylisting Malta last month, cited, among other things, lack of transparency on ultimate beneficial owners of companies and weak financial intelligence on tax crimes as the main “strategic deficiencies” of Malta’s financial jurisdiction.

Information about Maltese-owned Dubai companies such as Yorgen Fenech’s 17 Black and Paul Apap Bologna’s Kittiwake, both of which are suspected of having been set up to facilitate money laundering, tax evasion and the payment of illegal kickbacks, has made it clear that Dubai should be a centre of interest to the Maltese government in attempting to tackle financial crime.

According to the German government, “the purchased data will be used for the purpose of detecting tax crimes that have nationwide, international and/or major significance. The data can help shed light on unknown assets and undeclared income.”

“The illumination of cases with an international dimension helps to ensure tax compliance and tax enforcement,” the statement said.

The Shift first sent emailed questions to various official Malta government spokespeople two weeks ago, after the German government announced its purchase and offered any interested parties the opportunity to access the data.

So far,  despite several reminders, none of the spokespeople we have contacted has replied or even acknowledged our questions.

German finance minister Olaf Scholz says in the press release on his ministry’s website: “We are using all available instruments to detect tax crimes. This new data will enable us to shine a light into the dark corners where tax offenders continue to hide. Now it is up to tax investigators to track down the offenders and bring them to justice.”

                           
                               
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viv
viv
25 days ago

Interesting

Charles sammut
Charles sammut
24 days ago
Reply to  viv

I wonder if the PN can obtain access to this data?

Mick
Mick
25 days ago

I imagine Muscat et al will ensure that none of the information is made available as their nest eggs are at stake

Henry s Pace
Henry s Pace
25 days ago

Who would be the one to throw the first stone ?

James
James
24 days ago

It adds further grist to the mill as to why Germany was one of the prime movers to have Malta added to the FATF grey list and it wouldn’t take too much of a leap of faith to think that the German government has shared their initial findings with their counterparts in the U.K. and U.S.A would it?

No wonder you can’t get a response from any of the agencies because the chances are the names in that database will be those at the top table who are bleating so loudly that the FATF decision was unjust.

If they have nothing to hide they would reply to your enquiries, but they don’t because they have too much to hide!

Charles sammut
Charles sammut
24 days ago
Reply to  James

Hopefully the PN will be able to gain access to the information. Chances are that tgerrcare Maltese politicians and their mates on the list…so of course Abela and his minions will be loath to ask for the info!!!

carlo
carlo
24 days ago

Then we ask why the Germans, the Americans and the British agreed to greylisting Malta. Who knows what they know about our criminal muvument korrott. We should be thankful for not putting us on the blacklist.

“The illumination of cases with an international dimension helps to ensure tax compliance and tax enforcement,”

And this is what our corrupt government is against so we can be sure that the corrupt government will never pay a cent to get the information.

Godfrey Leone Ganado
Godfrey Leone Ganado
23 days ago
Reply to  carlo

Let’s not lose sight of the fact that Joseph Muscat, refused to publish Swissleaks, which was in his government’s possession, and which obviously still is a closely guarded secret of Robert Abela, who promised continuity, and who personally may be mentioned.

Steven Micallef
Steven Micallef
12 days ago

Please don’t forget this has been on the way since Tonio Fenech https://www.dw.com/en/malta-dismisses-accusation-of-being-a-german-tax-haven/a-4639285

Aggie
Aggie
24 days ago

If they don’t ask, they have plausible deniability

Carmelo Borg
Carmelo Borg
24 days ago

Issa naraw jekk il PN jaghmilx pressjoni fuq il gvern biex japplika lil Germanja biex jakwistaw dawn I’d dokumenti. Hemm jekk inkunu nafu il PN ghandux idejh imcapsin. Dak l iskandlu ya l isptar ma issemmiex altar ghax sew ID DB U JAMES CATERERS U HAGA WAHDA MAL PN

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