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Caruana Galizia family calls for ‘full public inquiry’ following government’s failure to investigate murder 

Caruana Galizia family calls for a public inquiry into whether journalist’s assassination could have been prevented

Daphne Caruana Galizia

The family of slain journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia called for a full public inquiry into her death and have asked whether anything could have been done to prevent the assassination.

One of Caruana Galizia’s sons, Paul, told BBC chief international correspondent Lyce Doucet “I hope the government will recognise we all have an interest in uncovering what really happened and in asking this crucial question, ‘could my mother’s life have been saved?’.”

The family will present a 24-page legal opinion to the Maltese High Commission in London and the BBC reported that the family’s lawyers are claiming that the Maltese government is not fulfilling its “investigative duty” under the European Convention for Human Rights.

“It’s sad its come to this point nine months later where we have to be more forceful in our request for a public inquiry,” Paul Caruana Galizia added.

“The Prime Minister of Malta has previously made a public promise that he would leave no stone unturned in relation to the investigation of my mother’s murder. Yet so far he has refused to establish a Public Inquiry to investigate whether her assassination could have been prevented, despite his legal obligation to do so,” Paul Caruana Galizia said in a statement.

He called Prime Minister Joseph Muscat to set up a public inquiry “without further delay so that further evidence is not lost. He has nothing to fear but the truth.”

The legal opinion was prepared by Caoilfhionn Gallagher QC and Jonathan Price of Doughty St Chambers, together with Tony Murphy of Bhatt Murphy.

Murphy said Muscat had been given until 31 August to reply, and that if he refused to open a public inquiry, the family would commence legal proceedings in Malta and perhaps ultimately in the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg.

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