Opinion: I want my money

“Neither the government nor the opposition nor an NGO” can demand his resignation, the omnipotent Central Bank governor and the man charged with misappropriation, Edward Scicluna, declared. ‘Nobody is going to take my massive income away from me’ was his message.

His pocket has always been his overwhelming priority. It still is, as he approaches the mature age of 78, despite having amassed 700,000 euros in personal bank deposits and another 150,000 in government bonds. For Edward, there’s no such thing as too much.

As he arrived in Court to face criminal charges, Scicluna sent a message to Robert Abela: you can’t kick me out of the Central Bank governor post – I’m here to stay. To remove me, he announced, you’ll have to go to the European court of Justice.  I’m not a minister in your cabinet whose sacking is your prerogative – I’m Central Bank governor, and there’s nothing you can do about it.

Scicluna simply has no shame and no self-respect.  His mentality is precisely the same as that of the crowd who gathered before the court a day earlier to welcome their heroes – Keith Schembri, Konrad Mizzi and Joseph Muscat.

For them, crime doesn’t matter, no matter how huge.  For them, the only thing that matters is “il-but” – the pocket.

One of them articulated the sentiment eloquently: “what do I care about corruption, the important thing is that he paid me”. (“X’jippurtani, l-aqwa li jtini”).

“Ghamilna nies”, one man commented, referring to Joseph Muscat, implying that Muscat improved his economic status, before adding “l-aqwa l-but” (my income comes first).

The only difference between that man jabbing his finger into the journalist’s chest and Scicluna is that the latter wore a tailor-made suit and appears to have a full set of teeth.  And there’s one other thing – the toothless gentleman is happy with a two hundred euro rise in his pension; it takes a little bit more to satisfy Scicluna.

Scicluna’s overwhelming greed blinds him to the damage and embarrassment he’s causing his country by desperately clinging to his post.

A former finance minister facing criminal charges of misappropriation of funds should not be representing any country in any position, let alone as Central Bank governor. It’s crystal clear to any half-decent human being what Scicluna should do, but not to Scicluna.

Scicluna remembers the times of severe austerity when he was forced to report from the counting halls of Naxxar. The trauma of deprivation during Mintoff’s years must have left its mark – an overwhelming, insatiable greed that dominates his psyche.

He told us under oath that although he was convinced Konrad Mizzi’s position was untenable after the Panama Paper revelations, he still voted in his support.

His explanation for those diametrically opposed positions was that he’d given up a 100,000 euro job in Brussels and couldn’t be expected to give up his ministerial post for such a minor issue as a criminal organisation being run from the prime minister’s office. Did you expect him to lose his ministerial salary to protect the nation from industrial-scale looting?

The man simply lacks self-respect. He’s immune to embarrassment. He’s like a cartoon figure with dollar signs for eyes—completely blind to the revulsion and nausea he induces.

When Robert Abela wanted to move him out of the cabinet to replace him with Clyde Caruana, Scicluna resisted.  Not because he felt Caruana was unsuitable for the post or because he couldn’t do a better job. No, Scicluna resisted because he didn’t want to lose his remuneration.

He embarrassed Abela, forcing him to delay his reshuffle until Scicluna got what he wanted – a better-paid, easier job than the one he had.

Abela had to force out another Labour stalwart, Mario Vella, from his position at the Central Bank to make way for Scicluna. Scicluna shamelessly boosted the salary of the Central Bank governor from 89,000 euros to 100,000 euros just weeks before he took the post himself.

Scicluna had written to Mario Vella on 21 July 2016, informing him that he’d been appointed Central Bank governor and that his remuneration “will remain unchanged throughout your term of office.” But when Scicluna twisted Abela’s arm to appoint him instead of Mario Vella, he swiftly boosted that salary by 11,000 euros.

When Scicluna finally moved to the Central Bank, he moved employees who had been in post for decades out to make way for his own people.  He removed the Central Bank Governor driver, who’d been in post for almost 30 years, to replace him with his own canvasser.  He insisted on bringing his own personal secretary with him to the central bank at the expense of other staff who were moved out.

That vicious streak was evident when he openly attacked the FIAU to defend the very people now charged with serious crimes – Konrad Mizzi, Keith Schembri and Joseph Muscat. “I want to know whether they (FIAU officials) were really apolitical?…Were these reports written to be leaked?” Scicluna commented.

Those reports were one report on the Panama papers and Konrad Mizzi’s alleged criminal activities and another about Keith Schembri’s alleged money laundering.

Days later, two senior FIAU officials were sacked – Jonathan Ferris, head of the financial analysis section and Charles Cronin, head of compliance. Scicluna refused to reply whether he was behind their sacking.

He later denied involvement, but he wrote to the PANA chairman in July 2017, claiming their sacking was “according to the law”.  Six years later an industrial tribunal found Ferris’ sacking unlawful, discriminatory, and unjustified.

Scicluna even committed perjury, testifying before the Caruana Galizia inquiry that he appointed Silvio Valletta on the FIAU Board because “he was the most senior” out of a list of three candidates submitted.  On that list was Pierre Calleja, an Assistant Police Commissioner far more senior than Valletta.

Edward Scicluna will do anything for money – lie under oath, sack officials, destroy the country, defend crooks, protect those accused of serious crimes, and completely humiliate himself, repeatedly.

                           

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17 Comments
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Joseph Tabone Adami
Joseph Tabone Adami
24 days ago

Would “A brief history of shame” be also a suitable title for this article?

Andy
Andy
24 days ago

Not really because there is absolutely no shame.

john borg
john borg
24 days ago

At his age there is not much time left before he gets increasingly frail physically and mentally.. perhaps with all the money he is stealing he thinks he can postpone this… alas he cant! This greedy man will never be able to enjoy his ill gotten money.

Mick
Mick
24 days ago

A Shameless liar who should get the maximum time in Corradino for all the people who never got the medical treatment they needed because of his insatiable greed
Best if he’s never released it’s called Karma

Francis
Francis
24 days ago

Nailed it

Jay Ho
Jay Ho
24 days ago

An excellent summary as always. I genuinely, naively believed that shame had a bottom of the barrel but again and again Labour liars manage to show us all new depths.

Nobody can make me live a good honest, hard working life. I do so because it’s the right thing to do. Even if I could raise my wage for no extra work, I wouldn’t do so, for I, like the vast majority of hard workers here have honest values – and we love this rock to much to allow the rape to continue.

S. Camilleri
S. Camilleri
24 days ago

“Scicluna simply has no shame and no self-respect.” Fits him to a T.

A. Fan
A. Fan
24 days ago

No empathy, no remorse, no conscience or shame, no accountability, dishonesty, callousness, disregard for laws and rules, hunger for power/control… What does all that spell?

Individuals with such traits typically get best along with their own kind who likewise view them as tools to be used in the furtherance of their own selfish interests.

A few names pop to mind that seem to fit this description rather well, both globally and locally.

Paul Borg
Paul Borg
24 days ago

A PIG IN A BUSINESS SUIT……….unfortunately there are many around!
His skin is so thick, that the knife killing his integrity cannot be felt.

joe tedesco
joe tedesco
24 days ago

TOTALLY UNTRUSTWORTHY.

Rob
Rob
24 days ago

Totally agree with every word. His statement outside the court spoke volumes about his greed. I remenber him nervously reporting at the counting hall decades ago on xandir malta. He was a nervous wreck and today he must think he struck gold by outsmarting the system. But to those who have more than one braincell he is clearly a greedy opportunist with żero principles.

wenzu
wenzu
24 days ago

Scicluna simply sets the standard for the rest of the egoistic crooks in the MLP.

Osservatore
Osservatore
24 days ago

Hardly an economist of calibre. I studied under him at university and he was nothing to wrote home about, more interested in retaining what he knows than sharing it. Nowhere near the stature of Josef Bonnici who I also studied under. Scicluna is a self-serving individual who knows how to strategically place himself in positions of opportunity. Very sad person really, and all the more apparent since he got involved with politics. He is not respected by the professionals, only by those to whom the nomenclature of Dr or professor is more impressive than it actually is.

Emmanuel
Emmanuel
24 days ago

Most of the people who gathered outside the Law Courts were blinde by Populism. I would have expected much better fom Professor Scicluna. Maybe his colleagues at the European Central Bank will explain better to him what he is expected to do in the mess he fiund himsekf in,

saviour mamo
saviour mamo
24 days ago

This man has no idea of ethical principles.

Robert pace bonello
Robert pace bonello
19 days ago

This piggyest of all PIGS has an insatiable appetite.

STEVE
STEVE
14 days ago

Labour is a magnet for these kind of people, definetilydon’t harbour socialist believes, no shame, no sense of what’s right or wrong, and greedy to the very core!

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