Konrad Mizzi mum on how he met Yorgen Fenech

Disgraced former energy minister Konrad Mizzi did not provide straight answers regarding how he first met former Electrogas shareholder and Daphne Caruana Galizia murder suspect Yorgen Fenech during another public accounts committee (PAC) hearing on the Electrogas deal.

While Mizzi did admit that he had attended meetings involving Electrogas’ board of directors as well as being present in tender selection and negotiation proceedings in which Fenech was present, he claimed that he was not aware of any meetings related to Electrogas that may have been held privately between the two.

Mizzi and his lawyers, Carol Peralta and Jean Paul Sammut, resorted to stonewalling tactics which have been used repeatedly throughout every sitting in which Mizzi made an appearance.

Overall, hardly any questions were answered given that the two-hour sitting was yet again hamstrung by lengthy, partisan spats, with Mizzi often resorting to digs at the Opposition’s time in government to deflect from answering the questions being posed.

Clinging to a ruling from the Speaker of the House which vaguely referred to a need for questions posed by the PAC to be “objective” in their nature, Mizzi vehemently refused to answer most of the questions posed by the committee by simply stating that questions were either not objective or not explicitly referred to in the auditor general’s report on the Electrogas deal.

Using these rebuttals, Mizzi did not answer questions about his interactions with Fenech, including an alleged text conversation between them following Fenech’s loss of his mobile phone in January 2019, questions which were posed by Opposition MP Karol Aquilina.

Mizzi took umbrage at Aquilina’s line of questioning, asking about how Aquilina sourced the information, to begin with, with his lawyers accusing Aquilina of abusing alleged sources within the police force and of engaging in a “fishing expedition”.

The former energy minister did not answer questions probing his repeated messages to Fenech about whether he had deleted conversations between the two.

Mizzi was also vague about other figures involved in the Electrogas deal – in particular, he dodged questions about his association with at least four individuals with whom he had ties before being elected to government. The same individuals were also involved in Labour’s working group prior to the Party being elected to govern in 2013, all of whom ended up on the committees that awarded the tender to Electrogas.

Similar to the last sitting two weeks ago, Mizzi did not provide details about whether he had any associations with David Galea (Beat Ltd), Brian Tonna (Nexia BT) and other members of the selection and negotiation committees that awarded the tender to Electrogas.

Mizzi also did not answer questions about how disgraced former chief of staff Keith Schembri was involved in Electrogas negotiations and whether Schembri was present in meetings held at Castille that revolved around the financing of the project. Mizzi did not confirm whether the meetings even occurred.

                           
                               
guest
2 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Godfrey Leone Ganado
3 months ago

The lunatic outbursts of dishonourable Konrad Mizzi, are the prototype of cornered rats.
Calling him a crook, is a ginormous understatement.
His planned delaying tactics, ably aided and abetted by his lawyers, and cover up Labour agents, smell of potential exhorbitant legal fees and undeclared gifts, which will obviously not be declared for income tax purposes.

Marc Sant
Marc Sant
3 months ago

Konrad Mizzi has refused to answer questions from the DCG Committee and the PAC to avoid self-incrimination and yet the Police Force and the AG’s office, over the span of more than 5 years, have not managed to prosecute Mizzi for any crimes.

Our PM has reminded us time and again that every person is equal under the Law. This may be so, but if the AG and the Police refuse to prosecute politicians because they fear repercussions in their career at the hands of politicians, then Robert Abela’s words seem hollow.

Related Stories

Get cracking, Clyde: memo 2 to the finance minister
Finance Minister Clyde Caruana would do well to watch
Portelli’s latest ‘flats village’ got planning approval three days before elections
A large industrial complex once used to produce tomato

Our Awards and Media Partners

Award logo Award logo Award logo Award logo